News and Blogs

UVM scientists develop possible HCM treatment

Posted on March 23, 2016

Scientists researching at the University of Vermont (UVM) have developed a possible treatment for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). HCM occurs as a result of mutations of proteins in the heart, including myosin, which acts as a molecular motor in heart muscle cells for pumping blood. In patients with HCM, myosin mutations have too much power and cause the heart to enlarge. The research team has tested a small molecule inhibitor that dials back the myosin to a normal level and, when tested in mice, prevented HCM from surfacing. Researchers...

Small changes can improve heart health

Posted on March 19, 2016

Making little changes every day may help improve your cardiac health. Eating well, exercising, and managing stress are three key factors that, over time, can really help your heart. Choosing the stairs instead of taking an elevator, switching from 2% to 1% milk, and taking a walk during your lunch break are a few small changes that can make a difference. Being proactive, paying attention to what you eat, and making the effort to move just a bit more can help you increase your chances of having a healthy heart. There are even phone apps and...

Technological advances helpful for cardiac health

Posted on March 12, 2016

The FDA-approved LifeVest, meant to be worn for two months after a heart attack, is just one example of how new technology can save lives. The vest tracks your heartbeats and shocks it back into rhythm if it begins to malfunction. It can reduce the risk of having a heart attack by 70%. Additionally, the Heartmate-II is the latest generation of a LVAD (left ventricular assist device) that uses magnetic technology to lower the chances of infection. These new wearable lifesavers have already done their job and, while currently on the expensive...

AFib may be higher risk factor in women than men

Posted on March 7, 2016

A recent study shows that a certain kind of irregular heartbeat, atrial fibrillation or AFib, in women is linked with about a 12% higher risk of deaths among women and a higher risk of getting a stroke. The study involved data from 30 other studies with over four million participants. Further research needs to be done regarding differences in cardiac-related ailments in women and men, but warning signs in women should be taken seriously and addressed.  Read more...

Living on lower ground may increase survival rates in cardiac arrest

Posted on February 29, 2016

New research shows that living on the high levels of a building may decrease your chance of survival in the event of cardiac arrest. A recent Canadian study shows that the further a cardiac arrest patient was from the ground floor, the lower the survival rate since it took emergency care teams longer to reach patients on higher floors. This study shows the need to focus on further interventions and solutions for reaching patients in high-rise buildings, including, for example, giving first responders sole access to elevators for emergency...

Little Hats, Big Hearts at Valley Hospital

Posted on February 23, 2016

The American Heart Association has partnered with The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood and two other NJ hospitals to implement the “Little Hats, Big Hearts” program during February, which is American Heart Month. The program, which will provide 300 handmade red caps to new moms for their newborns, is designed to raise awareness of congenital heart defects (CHDs), the nation’s most common birth defect, and to encourage new mothers to adopt a healthy lifestyle for all members of the family. NJ law requires hospitals to test all newborns for heart...

Signs for heart attacks in women can be less obvious than those in men

Posted on February 19, 2016

Women have dismissed the pain during a heart attack as indigestion, back pain, or nausea, so it is especially important to take note of the presence of potential heart attack symptoms. Men, on the other hand, experience pressure on the chest and have trouble breathing. Women should take note of these potential indicators, especially if they have common risk factors for heart disease which include high cholesterol, high blood pressure, uncontrolled diabetes, and being overweight. Read more about how to be proactive and avoid the emergency room...

Coffee may be beneficial for cardiac health

Posted on February 15, 2016

New research shows that coffee may be good for your heart. Recent studies have found that people who drank coffee daily were less likely to die prematurely from heart disease and stroke compared to people who drank little or no coffee. The benefits in coffee may be due to phytochemicals that may help reduce inflammation. With regard to blood pressure, coffee stimulates the heart and blood vessels, so those with high blood pressure should be alert. Read more...

3D printed hearts provide hands-on training for cardiac surgeons

Posted on February 10, 2016

New technology that prints 3D-printed child-sized hearts is helping cardiac surgeons prepare for intense operations. These model hearts are near-perfect duplicates and can be printed to include various cardiac anomalies. Cardiac surgeons have traveled to Toronto to practice procedures on the model hearts that would normally take years to learn. Surgeons believe this is an invaluably useful option available to less experienced doctors. Click here to read more....

Be cautious in the cold weather for your heart’s safety

Posted on February 5, 2016

In the cold weather, it’s especially important to be careful when it comes to matters of the heart. People who are not regularly active need to be cautious when grabbing a shovel to clear off snow; cold weather can cause an increase in blood pressure, which, combined with too much physical activity, can be dangerous. Dr. Leslie Cho, a cardiologist at Cleveland Clinic’s Heart and Vascular Institute, notes that, because of this, doctors often see a rise in heart attacks during the winter months. Read more about Dr. Cho’s recommendations...